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May approaches EU, seeks BREXIT deal reopening

By news desk

British Prime Minister, Theresa May, will ask the EU to reopen the withdrawal agreement, her spokesperson said.

In a news briefing, the spokesperson said May has told EU leaders that she intends to re-open Brexit negotiations to get her deal through parliament.

The announcement came on a day when British lawmakers will vote a series of amendments on the withdrawal agreement and the government’s Brexit strategy.

The EU has repeatedly said they would not renegotiate the agreed deal but they would consider extending article 50 process.

The U.K. is set to leave the EU on March 29 unless the article 50 is extended.

Among the amendments to be voted, if received green light from the parliament speaker John Bercow today, will be the one prepared by Labour MP Yvette Cooper that will ask MPs to delay the Brexit date for up to 9 months if a deal cannot be ratified until Feb. 26.

Another amendment proposed by Conservative MP Graham Brady aims to give the prime minister a mandate to go back to Brussels to negotiate an alternative for the backstop clause — a clause that is opposed by the parliament majority.

Airstrike kills scores of Afghan civilians

By News desk

At least 16 members of a single family have been killed in an airstrike by U.S. forces in Afghanistan’s restive Helmand province.

Helmand Governor Mohammad, Yasin Khan, has however condemned the strike and has called for an investigation.

 

Meanwhile, it was gathered that Mawlawi Madad, a Taliban improvised explosive device (IED) operations commander in the Helmand region, where many of these roadside bombs have killed innocent women and children, has been killed in an aerial operation by coalition forces in Sangin district.

The UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan announced that it is following up on credible reports of civilian casualties, including children, from the aerial operation.

Former President Hamid Karzai has vehemently condemned the airstrikes in Sangin.

“The former president, once again, calls upon the U.S. to intensify its efforts for peace rather than bombing Afghan homes,” Karzai’s office said in a statement.

Venezuelan President, Maduro, hails Turkey, Russia, China over support

By News desk

Venezuela’s president, Nicolas Maduro, has expressed his gratitude to Turkey, Russia and China Government for their support after opposition leader, Juan Guaido, declared himself “interim president”.

Maduro’s commendation came amid endorsement of the interim leader by United State, United Kingdom and Germany after the crisis that has trailed outcome of the presidential election.

The President said: “I thank Russia, China, Turkey and other governments and people of the world for their strong support of the legitimately established government of Venezuela.”

Maduro in a statement released on its official twitter handle yesterday added “Venezuela is not alone!.”

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan voiced solidarity with Maduro early Thursday, a day after Washington recognized Guaido as the interim leader of Venezuela.

Russian President, Vladimir Putin, called the foreign interference in Venezuela’s internal affairs a serious violation of international law.

China also said it supports “efforts” by Venezuela’s government to secure its national sovereignty.

Meanwhile, Palestinian resistance group Hamas in a written statement condemned the coup attempt and the open intervention of the U.S. in Venezuela’s internal affairs.

Hamas also praised the Venezuelan people for resisting against plots and backing the government, which unconditionally supports the Palestinian issue.

Meanwhile, a growing number of countries have lined up behind Guaido, the head of the National Assembly, who declared himself president under Articles 333 and 350 of the Venezuelan Constitution amid mass anti-government protests over the country’s economic crisis.

Guaido’s declaration was quickly recognized by the U.S., Canada and several fellow Latin American nations.

It would be recalled that Maduro took office in 2013 following the death of his predecessor Hugo Chavez.

After being inaugurated earlier this month, he is set to govern for another six-year term through 2025.

The U.S. has criticized Maduro throughout his time in office and has shown support for the National Assembly as the “last vestige of democracy”.

US lawmaker, Omar, condemns Trumps strategy on Venezuela

By News desk

As the crisis rocking Venezuela intensified, a United State (U.S.) Muslim congresswoman, Ilhan Omar, has condemned her country’s president, Donald Trump, stance on the presidential election held in South American country.

Omar, who was sworn in weeks ago as one of the Muslim lawmaker, stressed that rather than support coup in the nation, the U.S government should lead moves to end the face-off that has halted peace and harmony that once reign in the country.

in a message released on her official twitter handle, she said: “A US backed coup in Venezuela is not a solution to the dire issues they face. [President Donald] Trump’s efforts to install a far right opposition will only incite violence and further destabilize the region. We must support Mexico, Uruguay & the Vatican’s efforts to facilitate a peaceful dialogue.”

US orders non-emergency staff to leave Venezuela

By News desk

Following breakdown of law and order in Venezuela, the United State (U.S.) State Department has ordered all non-emergency U.S. government employees to leave Venezuela and issued a security alert for Americans in the capital Caracas amid growing tensions between the two countries.

“The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Venezuela,” the statement said.

American citizens were advised to contact the U.S. Embassy in Caracas for consular assistance.

The statement also stressed that U.S. citizens residing or traveling in Venezuela should “strongly consider” leaving the country.

The move comes a day after Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro announced that his country had cut off diplomatic relations with Washington and gave U.S. diplomats 72 hours to leave the country — a demand Washington has shrugged off, saying diplomatic personnel will stay at the invitation of opposition leader Juan Guaido.

A growing number of countries have lined up behind Guaido, the head of the National Assembly, who declared himself president Wednesday under Articles 333 and 350 of the Venezuelan Constitution amid mass anti-government protests.

Guaido’s declaration was quickly recognized by the U.S., Canada and several fellow Latin American nations.

US military strikes mosque in eastern Syria

By News desk

The United State (U.S.) military on Thursday destroyed a mosque in eastern Syria, alleging that the house of worship has been converted by Daesh terrorist as operation center within the axis.

This came barely a month after amid withdrawal of American troops from Syria which was announced by President Donald Trump.

The strike was conducted under Operation Inherent Resolve, the American military’s name for the country’s intervention in Iraq and Syria, with the goal of defeating Daesh.

“ISIS continues to violate the Law of Armed Conflict and misuse protected structures like hospitals and mosques, which causes a facility to lose its protected status,” U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) said in a statement, using another name for the Daesh terrorist group.

CENTCOM said the strike killed Daesh terrorists who had been using the mosque as a command center, however, they did not specify how many people were killed.

Over the past few months, the U.S. carried out several strikes on mosques throughout Syria, with the claim they hosted Daesh terrorists, killing dozens of civilians.

It would be recalled that last week, the U.S. struck another mosque in northern Syria a day after four Americans, including two soldiers, were killed in an apparent suicide attack claimed by Daesh in Manbij.

Venezuela withdraws diplomats from US

By News desk

The embattled Venezuelan President, Nicolas Maduro, has announced the withdrawal of its diplomatic personnel from the U.S.

All diplomatic personnel in the U.S. will return on Saturday after the closure of its embassy and consulates in the country, Maduro disclosed during a speech in the capital Caracas on Thursday.

The announcement came barely 24 hours after United State President, Donald Trump, backed the interim president, Juan Guaido.

Before the announcement, Maduro had yesterday announced his country cut off diplomatic relations with Washington and gave U.S. diplomats 72 hours to leave the country — a demand Washington officials have shrugged off, saying diplomatic personnel will stay at the invitation of Guaido.

Earlier, the U.S. called on Western hemisphere governments to recognize opposition leader Juan Guaido as the country’s interim president, drawing a swift rebuke from Venezuela’s internationally recognized government.

A growing number of countries have lined up behind Guaido, the head of the National Assembly, who declared himself president Wednesday under Articles 333 and 350 of the Venezuelan Constitution amid mass anti-government protests.

Guaido’s declaration was quickly recognized by the U.S., Canada, and several fellow Latin American nations.

Maduro first took office in 2013 following the death of his predecessor Hugo Chavez.

After being inaugurated earlier this month, the Venezuelan president is set to govern for another six-year term, through 2025.

The U.S. has criticized Maduro throughout his time in office, and shown support for the National Assembly as the “last vestige of democracy.”

Trump backs Venezuela interim president, Guaido

By News desk

US President Donald Trump on Wednesday recognized Venezuelan opposition leader, Juan Guaido, as the country’s interim president.

Trump described hard-left President, Nicolas Maduro, as “illegitimate” and said the National Assembly, headed by Guaido, is “the only legitimate branch of government duly elected by the Venezuelan people.”

Trump’s support for Guaido came shortly after the opposition leader declared himself “acting president” during a mass demonstration against Maduro.

The president noted that the National Assembly had declared Maduro “illegitimate, and the office of the presidency therefore vacant.”

“Venezuelans have courageously spoken out against Maduro and his regime and demanded freedom and the rule of law,” he said.

Trump urged other countries to follow his lead and promised to “use the full weight of United States economic and diplomatic power to press for the restoration of Venezuelan democracy.”

Apparently referring to tensions around the mass demonstrations against the Maduro government, Trump warned: “We continue to hold the illegitimate Maduro regime directly responsible for any threats it may pose to the safety of the Venezuelan people.”

Michael Jackson’s daughter, Paris checks into rehab

Paris, the daughter of late American pop star, Michael Jackson has checked into a rehabilitation facility to get help regarding her emotional health.

According to the magazine, PEOPLE, the 20-year-old decided that she needed to take some time off the scene in order “to reboot, realign and prioritise her physical and emotional health.

“She checked herself into a treatment facility to aid in her wellness plan and is looking forward to coming out of this revitalised and ready to tackle the exciting new projects that await her,” a PEOPLE source said.

It will be recalled that Paris was hospitalised in 2013 after attempting suicide.

She admitted the development in an interview with Rolling Stone in 2017.

She said, “I was crazy. I was actually crazy. I was going through a lot of, like teen, angst. And I was also dealing with my depression and my anxiety without any help.”

Paris also disclosed in the interview that she was sexually abused by a stranger which further increased her depression.

She is an actress, model, singer and is the second child and only daughter of Michael Jackson and Debbie Rowe.

Prosecutors frustrate Gbagbo’s return to Cote d’Ivoire

(Reuters) Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court on Wednesday asked judges to bar former Ivory Coast President, Laurent Gbagbo, from returning to his homeland, a day after he was acquitted on all charges.

In a filing ahead of a hearing on Wednesday in which judges are expected to discuss the terms of his release, prosecutors said if they appeal the acquittal, Ivory Coast might not ensure or be able to compel Gbagbo’s return to the Hague.

After Gbagbo’s arrest and extradition in 2011, Ivory Coast’s government has not cooperated with the court in other matters, prosecutors said in a statement.